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2020 7th Annual Tree Diversity Conference

 

To protect our urban forests, which are threatened by pests and pathogens, a greater variety of tree species is necessary.

 

For our sixth annual conference we will continue to explore the relationships between landscape design, horticultural practices and the use of a greater variety of tree species.

 

Between them, our speakers this year boast an extravagant depth of experience ranging from worldwide plant exploration to landscape and garden design, promotion of new plant materials, administration of some of our country's most noted horticultural conferences and institutions and hands-on experience with plant testing and data collection.

 

Public $80, includes all programming and lunch

$70 Promo, includes all programming and lunch

*Promotional price available to all Members of Colorado Tree Coalition

 

Symposium will be held at Denver Botanic Gardens in Mitchell Hall.

 

Speaker Lineup

 

The History of America's Urban Forests

Dr. Jill Jonnes

Dr. Jonnes surveys the long sweep of arboreal history in our cities and towns dating back to our nation's founding and continuing to our present-day foresters and researchers who are advocating for the importance of trees as our most important green infrastructure.

 

Jill Jonnes earned her doctorate in American History at Johns Hopkins University. She was the founder of the non-profit Baltimore Tree Trust and most recently is the author of "Urban Forests: A Natural History of Trees and People in the American Cityscape."

 

 

Tree Research on the Great Plains

Dr. Jason Griffin

Dr. Griffin discusses developments at the John C. Pair Horticultural Center in Wichita, Kansas, focusing on the testing of new woody plants in a climate not unlike that of our Rocky Mountain Front Range. He also speaks about the legacy of Dr. John C. Pair and the notable horticultural advances he carried out at the research center later named for him.

 

Jason Griffin has been the Director of the John C. Pair Horticultural Center, a unit of Kansas State University in Haysville, Kansas since he completed his doctoral studies in Horticultural Science and Plant Physiology at North Carolina State University in 2002.

 

 

Updates on Regional Species Diversity Augmentation

Kathleen Alexander and Michael Swanson

Urban forestry professionals from Denver and Boulder describe the status of tree species diversification in their communities, with emphasis on innovative species selection during the past five years and how those plants have thus far adapted to our challenging environment.

 

Kathleen Alexander has been with Boulder Forestry for 21 years, the last 10 as City Forester. She received her B.S. in Forest Biology and M.S. in Forest Management from Colorado State University and has been active in the ISA Rocky Mountain Chapter.

 

Michael Swanson has been with Denver Forestry for 18 years, the last 13 as Forestry Superintendent. Mike is an ISA-certified arborist and has volunteered extensively with the Colorado Tree Coalition and the ISA Rocky Mountain Chapter.

 

 

 

Exploring Trees of the Arid Southwest

Adam Black

Adam Black is the Horticultural Director of Peckerwood Gardens in Hempstead, Texas. Peckerwood Garden is a collection of more than 3,000 plants including many rarities; it is a conservation garden containing examples of numerous threatened species, many of which are no longer found in the wild. Previously he was the manager of the forest pathology and entomology laboratories at the University of Florida in Gainesville, FL.

 

Adam is a plant explorer who has sought out outstanding forms of native American trees in the Southwest, many of which have great potential to grow in Colorado.

 

Trees from Seed to City

Urban trees make a long and complex journey from seed to city. Whether propagated by seed, cutting, graft or tissue culture, it takes many skilled hands and a decade or more to grow a landscape-ready tree. It takes even longer to develop new and improved, genetically-diverse, climate-resilient cultivars suited for today’s challenging urban landscapes. Understanding these timelines, and learning the how and why of new cultivar development, will help you plan ahead for acquiring the best trees for urban forests of the future.

 

Nancy Buley

 

Nancy Buley is Director of Communications for J. Frank Schmidt & Son Co., where she has been “talking trees” for nearly 25 years on behalf of the wholesale growers based in Boring, Oregon. In recognition of her tree advocacy and stewardship efforts, she has earned various honors including a Horticultural Industries Leadership Award at Cultivate’18, a 2014 Frederick Law Olmsted Award from Arbor Day Foundation, and an Outstanding Professional Award from Oregon Community Trees.

Named a Lifetime Honorary Member of the American Society of Landscape Architects in 2004, Nancy is also a member of AmericanHort®, Oregon Association of Nurseries, GardenComm, International Society of Arborists, Society of Municipal Arborists, and a graduate of the Municipal Forestry Institute (MFI). She holds a bachelor’s degree in Technical Journalism and Horticulture from Oregon State University. A longtime member of the board of directors of Friends of Trees, Nancy lives and gardens in Boring, beneath an ever-widening canopy of shade.

 

 

A New Gardener Boot Camp

Are you a blank slate when it comes to starting your very own garden? Worried about ending the growing season with a pile of dead plants and sad vegetables? Join us at Denver Botanic Gardens for a full day event, packed with answers to all those looming and mysterious gardening questions. Get started on the right foot this year with all of our best beginner’s classes, carefully designed to equip you with all the tools you’ll need to master that garden once and for all!

 

Classes include:

 

Garden Planning 101… where do I start?

This beginner’s class will take you step by step through the process of laying out a plan of attack for your garden! Whether you are starting with a blank slate garden or working with an old outdated garden this class will give you the basics on where to start. It will discuss needs and planning tools for raised beds, container gardens and in-ground vegetable gardens. We will discuss the basics of garden locations, sun requirements, water needs, starting from seed, transplanting and the basics of planning the organization of perennials and annuals, trees and shrubs. This class is the perfect fit for anyone needing to understand how the garden works together as a whole.

 

Soils 101

Soils will always be the first place to start when building a beautiful garden. This class will cover the best management practices for building your soil for in-ground beds, containers and raised beds. It will discuss the basics of composting as well as demonstrate the value of soil testing.

 

Beginning Vegetable Gardening

If you have never planted edible plants or had little success at growing your own vegetables, Brien will walk you through the ABCs from planning, soil preparation, crop selection, watering, fertilizing, pest protection, and harvesting your first vegetable garden. Brien will cover tips on the most popular vegetables to grow, including leafy salad greens, tomatoes, squash, peppers, and more. You'll leave with a comprehensive understanding of how to successfully do each gardening task, and take home a planting guide that will help you through the entire growing season.

 

Annuals and Perennials for Color in the Garden

Plants provide the backbone of the garden with vibrant colors, textures, and forms that weave together to create your own personal oasis. Learn the basics of perennials, annuals and biennials, how to make the best selections for your garden and how to best maintain your plants throughout the season. From the traditional to the unusual we will explore the limitless varieties of plants and send you into the growing season prepared.

 

These classes combined usually cost more than $200, but with New Gardener Boot Camp, the event will be $60 members, $80 non-members. Register early as space is limited.

 

Lunch included with registration

Battling the Japanese Beetle

Rocky Mountain Gardening Elective

The Japanese beetle – found in many Front Range areas - is moving to new communities. This unwelcome beetle is concerning home owners with serious damage to plants. Instructor Betty Cahill takes the class through the management options for the Japanese beetle during its adult and larval stages. She provides tips on how to protect your favorite plants, including a plant list that Japanese beetles prefer and mostly avoid.

Instructor: Betty Cahill

Price: $31, $26 member

Cafe Botanique

Café Botanique is a part of the Botanical Art and Illustration Certificate Program and is open to Botanical Art and Illustration students, Gardens' members, the general public, academia and artists. The 30-40 minute talk starts at 6:30 p.m. and is followed by a discussion. This lecture offers one elective credit hour in the BI-program. Fee: $5.

 

 

Colorado Ecosystems

Rocky Mountain Gardening Required Course Group II

Study the native ecosystems of Colorado that range from plains grasslands to the alpine tundra, mountain meadows to sub-alpine forests. Learn to gauge your elevation and location by looking at the plant communities around you and explore the complex relationships between the plants and wildlife of Colorado.

 

Price: $88, $78 member

 

Instructor: Sheridan Samano

 

 

Ecology for Gardeners

Rocky Mountain Gardening Required Course Group I

Ecology is the study of interactions in nature. It seeks to understand the relationship between organisms to their environment and to each other. Successful gardening involves understanding and applying these principles. Basic principles of ecology will be explored in relationship to conditions in the Rocky Mountain region. Current environmental issues of the region will also be considered.

 

Price: $91, $81 member

 

Instructor: Sheridan Samano

 

Literature of the Land Book Club - Fall

 

Join us for the Fall 2019 session of Literature of the Land, a book club series hosted by the Helen Fowler Library. We’ll read three books over three months, focusing on a specific topic of interest. This fall we will be discussing farmland in America. What does it mean to farm, and how can we sustainably feed a nation? Learn if we can harvest while addressing issues of chemical waste, loss of topsoil, and the ever-changing landscape of corporate agriculture from the experiences of family farms and land workers who care about what they grow from soil to seed.

Starting in September, we will discuss This Blessed Earth by Ted Genoways. October will bring us to Farming for the Long Haul by Michael Foley, and we’ll wrap up in November with Lentil Underground by Liz Carlisle.

 

September: This Blessed Earth by Ted Genoways

 

October: Farming for the Long Haul by Michael Foley

 

November: Lentil Underground by Liz Carlisle

 

Each session has individual registration. Please select all three date options with separate registration if you would like to attend the entire series.

 

Price: $5 general public

Special Instructions: Registration is mandatory as attendance will be limited in number to allow for interactive discussion in a friendly group setting.

 

Rocky Mountain Horticulture I: Gardening Principles

Rocky Mountain Gardening Required Course Group I

This class details all the specifics necessary to grow plants successfully in the Rocky Mountain region. Soil preparation, plant choice and location, planting techniques and year-round maintenance specific to Colorado will be covered. We'll review plant growth, fertilizers, microclimates and more.

Price: $161, $135 members

Instructor: Thaddeus Gourd attended New Mexico State University where he graduated with a B.S. degree in Pest Management and Horticulture. He earned a Master’s Degree with thesis study in Entomology at New Mexico State University and a Ph.D. in Plant Pathology with emphasis on plant parasitic nematodes at North Carolina State University. Thaddeus has worked over 19 years in the private sector of the plant science business and since 2000, has worked at Colorado State University Extension as an Agriculture Agent and Director for Adams County. He has extensive experience of gardening and greenhouse management and has been involved in the practice of Integrated Pest Management for over 30 years.

Special Instructions: All students are requested to bring graph paper and pencils to the first class

Photo courtesy of: Soil Science (flickr)

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