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7:00 PM - Wednesday, March 23, 2016 (14 Tickets Still Available)
7:00 PM - Thursday, March 24, 2016 (14 Tickets Still Available)
7:00 PM - Wednesday, April 20, 2016 (14 Tickets Still Available)
7:00 PM - Thursday, April 21, 2016 (14 Tickets Still Available)
7:00 PM - Wednesday, May 18, 2016 (14 Tickets Still Available)

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2016 Tree Diversity Conference - DESIGN WITH MORE. TREE. TYPES.

For a third consecutive year four noted speakers will share more ideas for diversifying the Colorado Front Range tree species palette and how to make them feel welcome and prosper in our difficult high plains conditions.

Our focus this year will also be on the way tree species diversity can enable and enhance innovative landscape design whether for water conservation or esthetic objectives.

 

Increased species diversity is not just about tree census numbers but also about improving our approach to landscape design. Our third tree diversity conference will focus on how greater tree variety can enhance landscape esthetics and conversely, how innovative landscape design can accommodate a broader range of tree species.

The March 3, 2016 program will feature one of the foremost horticulture professors from the Front Range; a noted landscape architect with extensive xeriscaping experience in Texas and New Mexico; a Washington state horticulture professor noted for science-based debunking of arboriculture myths; and a Midwest arboretum owner, author and introducer of new tree cultivars. In addition we will hear a presentation on how many of the lesser-known tree species already growing in our region fared when tested against the severe weather events of the past year.

 

 

$75, includes all programming and lunch

 

SPEAKER BIOGRAPHIES AND LECTURE TOPICS

 

Linda Chalker-Scott | Killing With Kindness: How We Enable Trees to Their Ultimate Demise.

This seminar will discuss the underlying problems with accepted planting practices including popular soil amendments and heavily marketed garden products that all contribute to landscape tree failure. Handouts will be provided and questions encouraged.

Linda Chalker-Scott has a Ph.D. in horticulture from Oregon State University and is an ISA certified arborist and ASCA consulting arborist. She is Washington State University’s extension urban horticulturist and an associate professor in the Department of Horticulture. She is the author of four books, most recently “How Plants Work: The Science Behind the Amazing Things Plants Do.” Along with her academic colleagues, she hosts “The Garden Professors” blog and Facebook pages, through which they educate and entertain an international audience.

 

David Cristiani | Dryland Trees: Onward!

It’s time to rethink our struggling urban forests, and set them on higher ground. Embracing what makes a place great, David will separate the false and cliché from inviting habitats--respectful of geography, climate extremes, limited water, soils and resulting patterns. Everyone benefits when trees mitigate urbanization on any scale and add visual drama, so put on your west-of-100 degree meridian eyes.

David Cristiani is a landscape architect registered in three states. He has spent over two decades designing public and private gardens of and for drylands, linking people to their appealing, natural sense of place. David researches ecoregions to inform better landscape design and assists growers by collecting seed of tough plants. He also writes and blogs about outdoor living. His design practice, Quercus, is based in El Paso.

 

Jim Klett | Thirty-Five Years of Tree Research and Teaching.

Dr. Klett will recap the highlights of his long tenure at CSU and the changes he’s seen in arboriculture practice and education, particularly how greater tree species availability can complement modern trends in landscape design. He will describe the history of his work with multi-site trialing of promising tree species and cultivars, the current status of PERC and the CSU Arboretum, and some of the plants he feels have the brightest future in the Colorado Front Range.

Jim Klett is professor of landscape horticulture and an extension landscape horticulturist at Colorado State University. He has been at CSU for 35 years and teaches in the areas of herbaceous and woody plant materials and in nursery production and management. He works directly with the green industry of Colorado, especially the nursery, arboriculture, garden center and landscape contractor industries. His research deals with landscape plant evaluation and introduction water requirements of landscape plants, green roofs and other culturally related concerns with landscape plants.

 

Sonia John and Mike Kintgen | Trees that Thrived, Trees that Survived and the Rest.

At our last two conferences we’ve heard about many uncommon tree species we might use to diversify our region’s urban forests. Extreme weather over the last year posed a severe challenge to many of those species and in fact even resulted in the loss of many common trees ordinarily considered reliable here. Mike and Sonia have scouted out and photographed a large number of lesser-known tree species to evaluate how well they handled the severe weather and will comment on the degree to which they can still be recommended for expanded use in the region.

Sonia John has been the chair of the organizing committee for this and the two prior tree diversity conferences. She was the senior author of the Denver Botanic Gardens-published book “Denver’s Canopy: the Nature of Deciduous Trees” and also wrote and illustrated the “Washington Park Tree Guide.” In the past she has worked closely with Drs. Martin Quigley and David Christophel, the first two directors of the University of Denver Arboretum.

Mike Kintgen is curator of alpine collections at Denver Botanic Gardens where he also oversees eight other gardens with significant collections of woody plants. A full time staff member of the Gardens since 2004, Mike has worked to increase the Gardens’ collections of Quercus, Sorbus and conifer species. Lately, he has been experimenting with various tree species on land at 8,200 ft. near Steamboat Springs. Mike has lectured nationally in Colorado and other states, and internationally in Sweden, Germany and Argentina about the Gardens and its current focus on steppe and high elevation floras in semi-arid regions around the world.

 

Guy Sternberg | The Artistic Morphology of Trees.

Find the inspiration of seeing trees with a broad new perspective. Guy covers the subtleties of seasons, lighting, tree features at eye level and ground level, fragrance, wildlife interactions, how to experience the full measure of trees and view-shed management as related to tree placement. Learn how to use the artistic features of your existing trees more effectively in the landscape and how to plan for new trees.

Guy Sternberg is the founder of Starhill Forest Arboretum in Petersburg, Illinois. Starhill is now a unit of Illinois College in nearby Jacksonville, IL. Guy retired after a long career with the Illinois Dept. of Natural Resources and is a life member of the International Society of Arboriculture and the International Dendrology Society as well as a landscape architect. He is also a founding member of the International Oak Society. He has written two books on native American trees (Timber Press) and has introduced many new tree cultivars.

A Midcentury Icon: 50 Years of the Boettcher Tropical Conservatory

The Gardens’ Boettcher Memorial Tropical Conservatory was completed in 1966. The building has been a midcentury architectural landmark for 50 years. Designed by architects Victor Hornbein and Ed White, the 11,500 square foot building took two years to build and is the only conservatory in the country made of cast-in-place concrete. Even before its completion, the building won international recognition for its unique design and unusual structure. More than 600 species and varieties of tropical plants are displayed. The tropical terrain includes pools, waterfalls and four resident ducks.

 

To celebrate this anniversary, the Gardens is hosting a special event. Guests are invited to enjoy 60s-themed appetizers and nonalcoholic beverages, tours of the conservatory and a presentation in Mitchell Hall featuring a video interview with lead architect Ed White, Dan Havekost associate architect and Richard Breaker from GH Phipps Construction. A panel discussion with architecture and history experts further explores how this building has been an icon on Denver’s architectural landscape and continues to inspire architects and enthusiasts of midcentury design. The conservatory will open to allow the rare opportunity to tour the space with horticulturists and docents after dark. Markers will identify plants that have been present since 1966.

 

$25, $20 member

 

Panel Participants:

Jandel Allen-Davis, MD, Denver Botanic Gardens Board Chair, Panel Moderator

Kurt Klanderud, President of GH Phipps Construction Companies

Kim Manajek, Associate Director of Exhibitions, Art & Interpretation at Denver Botanic Gardens

David Daniel, Associate Principal, Davis Partnership Architects

Steve Turner, Vice President of Preservation Programs at History Colorado, State Historic Preservation Officer

 

 

All Natural Skin Care

See how easy and inexpensive it is to make your own facial steams with herbs, cleansing grains, masques, herbal toners, astringents, blemish cream, and lip balm. Learn how to make a rich, nutrient dense moisturizer, tailoring the recipe to meet your individual skin needs and issues.

 

Take home materials include the lotion made in class, an extensive handout, a month supply jar of moisturizer, and a pot of lip balm.

 

Instructor: Christina Blume

 

$63 member, $68 non-member

 

 

 

Beekeeping Basics

 

This introductory class is great for people thinking about starting a beehive. Instructor, Tracy Bellehumeur teaches about how honeybees live, different hive designs and how to get started as a beekeeper. A handout with suggested reading, supportive resources and local beekeeping groups is provided.

 

$36 members, $42 non members

 

About our instructor:

Tracy Bellehumeur has been raising bees for six years using natural methods in Top Bar and Langstroth hives and helps maintain hives for community gardens in Boulder. She is the beekeeping instructor for Growing Gardens in Boulder and one of the teachers for the Boulder County Beekeepers Association, specializing in honeybee pests and diseases.

 

 

 

Beginning Bonsai

 

Are you mystified by the many centuries old Japanese tradition of bonsai? Join us for an entertaining and informative class with local Bonsai Master, Harold Sasaki and the Gardens’ Bonsai Specialist Larry Jackel as they debunk the myths, fictions and misconceptions surrounding this living art form.

 

Each participant receives a tree, ceramic pot, wire, soil and gravel in this hands-on experience of creating a finished bonsai, which you can home.

$78 member, $82 non-member, includes $30 for materials.

Instructor: Harold Sasaki and Larry Jackel

There will be a break for lunch, please bring lunch or there is a cafe onsite for you to purchase lunch.

 

 

 

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