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2014 Horticulture Home Garden Tour

Have you ever attended a class or lecture, or read an article or blog post from one of our top Horticulturists and wondered what their home garden looks like? Well now is your chance to find out with a behind-the-scenes tour! Three of our most experienced and popular members of our Horticulture staff, Panayoti Kelaidis, Mike Kintgen, and Dan Johnson, will open up their gardens for this special opportunity.

 

Home Garden of Panayoti Kelaidis

Many thousands of plants are combined for four season interest in this Plant Collector’s garden. The Western half of the property is planted with native trees, shrubs and many cacti and western Wildflowers - almost eliminating watering needs. The Eastern half includes a large vegetable garden, perennial borders with many unusual perennials and bulbs, and a woodland garden that encircles the alpine garden on the east side of the house. Late May is when many of the Daphnes and Rhododendrons bloom, along with a host of classic alpine plants like saxifrages, dianthus and penstemons. There are several hundred containers located everywhere in this garden, many filled with annuals that are beginning their show as well…

By matching plants to microclimate, and combining plants of similar growth rate, we are able to create plantings that persist over time and need less maintenance than one might suspect with such biodiversity!

 

Home Garden of Mike Kintgen

Mike Kintgen’s garden started in 2009 with a bare canvas of dead bluegrass and a few overgrown junipers in the front yard. The dandelions, bluegrass, and junipers were removed to create a series of short berms in front of the house that made way for a Legacy buffalo grass lawn planted with spring and autumn flowering bulbs. The berms showcase a wide array of steppe and rock garden plants from around the world that are tolerant to Colorado’s hot dry summers and cold winters. The back yard is a mix of more traditional garden elements, a large propagation area, a small vegetable garden, and various rocks gardens.. There is also a large collection of alpine plants in troughs and containers filled with annuals for season long interest.

The overarching mission of the garden is to showcase how xeriscapes and rock gardens can be interesting, beautiful and more sustainable than traditional landscapes.

 

Home Garden of Dan Johnson

This average city lot supports an eclectic garden that is anything but average, the result of a driven collector with a creative proclivity. Uncommon plants greet the visitor even at the street, where a warm terracotta wall frames the stucco home and small front gardens. The gardens slope downwards behind the home, with red flagstone paths and boulders creating distinct spaces. The theme throughout is one of pushing the envelope for Colorado gardening. Deliberate use of microclimates and selective irrigation seem to make anything possible. Magnolias, wisteria, sheltered fuchsias and palms, Japanese maples and bamboo seem unlikely in their proximity to cacti, penstemon, agaves and yuccas. Collections made in Spain, South Africa and Pakistan mingle with more traditional fare. Sculptural elements and found objects enhance the sense of surprise. A small stream leads through the contours of the gardens to a koi pond with lotus and waterlilies. Photographers delight in the detail and unusual vignettes. Recovering from a brutal winter, a few specimens may be less than prime, but nevertheless, this garden still surprises.

 

This Tour will meet at Denver Botanic Gardens at York Street at 8:30 a.m. and return to Denver Botanic Gardens at York Streeet at 12:30 p.m. A chartered bus will escort all participants, the cost of the bus is included in the price of the tour. No self guided tours available.

 

$46 members, $51 non-members, includes bus transportation

 

Cherokee Fall Nature Hike - At Cherokee Ranch and Castle

 

Those lucky enough to have hiked Cherokee Ranch know that there are a wealth of habitats and a rich flora that distract your eyes downwards, even as the vistas of the rugged backbone of the Rockies and distant misty towers of downtown Denver tempt you to look further away. We have experienced toasty winter days that were breathless and surprisingly sunny, as well as blustery days in the summer. One thing is for sure you will never be bored on a Cherokee hike! This year we are starting much earlier for better birding. But the plants will already be awake!

 

In Fall the Sumac and plums are turning color in the gullies, and the oaks are showing some burnished bronze. Fall is a fabulous season on Cherokee Ranch Senecio, Aster and Goldenrod are everywhere. Blazing star paints purple spikes in the tousled mats of buffalo grass. The Spotted Towhee bird can be overlooked in the spring and summer, is more visible now since many of the spring and summer residents have started their fall migration. Two species of Jays – Scrub and Steller’s can now get the attention they deserve. They can be “missed” in spring and summer as we look at the other species.

 

 

$20 member, $25 non-member.

 

Tour Guides: Panayoti Kelaidis and Lynn Willcockson

 

* Please wear comfortable shoes and bring your own supply of water for a 2 hour adventure

*Directions and details for your hike will be emailed to your email address approximately one week before your hike

 

Hike location -

Cherokee Ranch and Castle

6113 N Daniels Park RD

Sedalia, CO 80135

 

* Plants don’t really care how you dress for the field trips but BIRDS DO!! It is easier to see birds if you DO NOT wear white or other very bright colors –i.e. yellow, orange or red. Also, bring your binoculars: they can be used for both birds and plants

 

 

 

 

Cherokee Late Summer Nature Hike - At Cherokee Ranch and Castle

 

Those lucky enough to have hiked Cherokee Ranch know that there are a wealth of habitats and a rich flora that distract your eyes downwards, even as the vistas of the rugged backbone of the Rockies and distant misty towers of downtown Denver tempt you to look further away. We have experienced toasty winter days that were breathless and surprisingly sunny, as well as blustery days in the summer. One thing is for sureùou will never be bored on a Cherokee hike! This year we are starting much earlieræor better birding. But the plants will already be awake!

 

Late summer is an excellent time to observe the bounty of both flora and fauna rolling through the hills of Cherokee Ranch. Aster and Goldenrod are everywhere. Blazing star paints purple spikes in the tousled mats of buffalo grass. Mid- summer bird activity continues at Cherokee as well. It is possible to see three species of hummingbirds as they stop to feed to store up energy on their way to Central America for the winter. The Mountain and Western Bluebirds have finished nesting and the young (juveniles) are seen throughout the Ranch property. There is no better place to soak up the sun than on a late summer plant hike and bird watching adventure at Cherokee Ranch

 

Tour Guides: Panayoti Kelaidis and Lynn Willcockson

 

$20 member, $25 non-member.

 

* Plants don´ really care how you dress for the field trips but BIRDS DO!! It is easier to see birds if you DO NOT wear white or other very bright colors ©.e. yellow, orange or red. Also, bring your binoculars: they can be used for both birds and plants

*Directions and details for your hike will be emailed to your email address approximately one week before your hike

 

Hike location -

Cherokee Ranch and Castle

6113 N Daniels Park RD

Sedalia, CO 80135

 

* Please wear comfortable shoes and bring your own supply of water for a 2 hour adventure

 

Cherokee Spring Nature Hike - At Cherokee Ranch and Castle

Those lucky enough to have hiked Cherokee Ranch know that there are a wealth of habitats and a rich flora that distract your eyes downwards, even as the vistas of the rugged backbone of the Rockies and distant misty towers of downtown Denver tempt you to look further away. We have experienced toasty winter days that were breathless and surprisingly sunny, as well as blustery days in the summer. One thing is for sure—you will never be bored on a Cherokee hike! This year we are starting much earlier—for better birding. But the plants will already be awake!

 

Spring comes gently on the Ranch: pasque flowers and easter daisies greet us as well as penstemons and numerous members of the pea family. What a great way to launch the new season than to amble through the Gambel Oaks seeking out early flowers and experiencing Spring Migration of several species of birds. The always spectacular Western Tanager is stopping off on its way from wintering in Mexico to its nesting area higher in the Colorado Mtns. You might see a Swainsons Hawk which has wintered in Argentina YES, ARGENTINA and makes the trip every spring to nest in this area. Nesting birds will be singing to attract a mate and establish a breeding territory. It is a great time to be outdoors.

Tour Guides: Mike Kintgen and Lynn Willcockson

 

 

$20 member, $25 non-member.

 

* Plants don’t really care how you dress for the field trips but BIRDS DO!! It is easier to see birds if you DO NOT wear white or other very bright colors –i.e. yellow, orange or red. Also, bring your binoculars: they can be used for both birds and plants

* Please wear comfortable shoes and bring your own supply of water for a 2 hour adventure

*Directions and details for your hike will be emailed to your email address approximately one week before your hike

 

Hike location -

Cherokee Ranch and Castle

6113 N Daniels Park RD

Sedalia, CO 80135

 

 

 

Cherokee Summer Nature Hike - At Cherokee Ranch and Castle

 

Those lucky enough to have hiked Cherokee Ranch know that there are a wealth of habitats and a rich flora that distract your eyes downwards, even as the vistas of the rugged backbone of the Rockies and distant misty towers of downtown Denver tempt you to look further away. We have experienced toasty winter days that were breathless and surprisingly sunny, as well as blustery days in the summer. One thing is for sure—you will never be bored on a Cherokee hike! This year we are starting much earlier—for better birding. But the plants will already be awake!

 

At the beginning of Summer the grasses have greened up, although there may still be snow on the higher peaks, when we walk through meadows full of the bounty of early summer this is the peak season for many of the loveliest wildflowers; including One-sided Penstemon (Penstemon virgatus), lupines and Monument plant. It is also peak season for the Broad-tailed Hummingbirds that have made their way back from Mexico and Central America to nest at Cherokee. We will learn how to identify the male Broad-tailed Hummingbird just by hearing it fly as it darts between scarlet gilia trumpets. Two species of bluebirds and swallows will be active at this time as well as the tiny (4 ½ in) Blue-gray Gnatcatcher that has returned from its winter grounds as far away as Central America to nest at Cherokee. Summer is prime time for viewing the plant and bird life at Cherokee, folks!

 

 

$20 member, $25 non-member.

 

Tour Guides: Panayoti Kelaidis and Lynn Willcockson

 

 

 

Hike location -

Cherokee Ranch and Castle

6113 N Daniels Park RD

Sedalia, CO 80135

 

* Plants don’t really care how you dress for the field trips but BIRDS DO!! It is easier to see birds if you DO NOT wear white or other very bright colors –i.e. yellow, orange or red. Also, bring your binoculars; they can be used for both birds and plants

* Please wear comfortable shoes and bring your own supply of water for a 2 hour adventure

*Directions and details for your hike will be emailed to your email address approximately one week before your hike

 

 

 

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