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Lectures

 

Cancellation Policy: Cancellations more than one week prior to a class are subject to a 15% cancellation fee. Cancellations with less than one weeks notice are non-refundable; please consider your payment a donation to the Gardens.

 

Calder: Connected to the Contemporary

Curator Lynne Warren presents examples that demonstrate the effect Alexander Calder has had on artists working today. Warren curated the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago’s exhibition Alexander Calder and Contemporary Art: Form, Balance, Joy, authoring a book by the same name. She has written more than 30 exhibition catalogs and has taught courses at prominent Chicago universities.

Price: $25, $20 member

Speaker: Lynne Warren, Curator at Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago

Calder: From Miniature Circus to Monumental Sculpture

Alfred Pacquement, guest curator of Calder: Monumental, details the life and career of this American master. Pacquement was Director of the Musée National d’Art Moderne at the Centre Georges Pompidou from 2000-2013. He is an independent curator and cultural consultant, responsible for numerous exhibitions, including Calder at the Rijksmuseum, 2014.

Price: $25, $20 member

Speaker: Alfred Pacquement, guest curator of Calder: Monumental and former director of Musée National drt Moderne at the Centre Georges Pompidou

Juno: Queen of Irises, with Tony Hall

“Juno: queen of irises” by Tony Hall, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew

 

Juno Iris are a section of the iris genus with nearly 100 species and countless hybrids. They are distinguished by the corn-plant like foliage and their dahlia like roots—and have a spectacular range of flower color. The very first plate in the first issue of Curtis Botanical Magazine published in 1787 was of Iris persica, a Juno Iris! This amazing group of irises that grow from the Mediterranean to Mongolia: the only one commonly seen in the Denver area is Iris bucharica--but almost all them should prove to be outstanding garden plants in our climate, since they are mostly found in high steppe in Asia.

 

Speaker: Tony Hall was Horticulturist in the Alpine Section of RBG Kew since the 1970’s (focusing on the Alpine House and the famous collection of potted alpines at that garden), and continues his research there in his retirement. He is completing a monograph on the Juno Irises which is sure to be a classic!

Price: $29, $24 member

Image: Signa.org

Lecture - Restoring Nature’s Relationships

Specialized relationships between animals and plants are the norm in nature rather than the exception. Plants that evolved in concert with local animals provide for their needs better than plants that evolved elsewhere. Tallamy explains how specialized food relationships determine the stability and complexity of local food webs and how we can us residential landscapes to connect isolated habitat fragments and produce valuable ecosystem services

 

Doug Tallamy

Doug Tallamy is a professor in the department of entomology and wildlife ecology at the University of Delaware, where he has authored 85 research publications and has taught insect taxonomy, behavioral ecology, humans and nature, insect ecology and other courses for 35 years. His research goal is to better understand how insects interact with plants and how such interactions determine the diversity of animal communities. His book “Bringing Nature Home: How Native Plants Sustain Wildlife in Our Gardens” was awarded the 2008 Silver Medal by the Garden Writers' Association. “The Living Landscape,” co-authored with Rick Darke, was published in 2014. He is also a regular columnist for Garden Design magazine.

 

6 p.m. Social hour and tasting hosted by Slow Food Denver (included in price)

6:30 p.m. Program and lecture

8:00 p.m. Book signing by author

All lecture programs: $15 member, $20 non-member. Space is limited so register early!

Slow Food Members are welcome to register for the discounted member price of $15, please click on reciprocal member price, no identification required.

 

“Water, water, water...There is no shortage of water in the desert but exactly the right amount, a perfect ratio of water to rock, water to sand, insuring that wide free open, generous spacing among plants and animals, homes and towns and cities, which makes the arid West so different from any other part of the nation. There is no lack of water here unless you try to establish a city where no city should be.” ? Edward Abbey, Desert Solitaire: A Season in the Wilderness

With the support of the Bonfils-Stanton Foundation and in line with the Gardens’ mission of connecting people with plants, we are excited to bring you a series designed to explore water as it relates to our ability to thrive in Colorado’s dry environment.

Throughout the 2017 series, we explore the importance of water through the lens of art, home gardening, conservation and home ownership. The lecture series includes topics such as enhancing the abundance of water throughout the world, rock gardening and water quality of the Colorado River through underwater photography.

A parallel series of intimate workshops, tours and trips further the exploration. Workshops include water-harvesting, aquaponics, photogram water camera-less photography, insect home building and many other hands-on opportunities. The Gardens offers day-long tours of Habitat Hero Gardens, gardens that provides resources and habitat for insects. A self-guided water wise home garden tour allows participants to explore ways in which their fellow Denverites use low water plants and water conservation techniques. Further your water experience by joining the Gardens on multi-day trips, including a canoe trip down the Gunnison River alongside a wetland ecologist and a photography trip to view the stunning water features around Vail.

 

 

Lecture - Rock Gardening: Reimagining a Classic Style

Inspired by the tiny plants and dramatic, rocky landscapes found on mountain tops, rock gardening uses a range of unusual plants in combination with beautiful stones to create miniaturized landscapes. This approach to gardening is water-wise, perfect for containers, small gardens and for gardeners interested in exploring a whole new group of beautiful plants. In this talk Joseph Tychonievich shares beautiful images of rock gardens to get you inspired, the basic principles of creating rock gardens and an introduction to some of the most beautiful and easy to grow rock garden plants to get you started.

 

Joseph Tychonievich

A lifelong gardener and lover of plants, southeast Michigan resident Joseph Tychonievich earned his bachelor of science in horticulture from Ohio State University, worked at specialty rare plants nurseries in Michigan and Japan, and was named by Organic Gardening Magazine as one of “...six young horticulturists who are helping to shape how America gardens.” He is the author of “Plant Breeding for the Home Gardener” and “Rock Gardening: Reimagining a Classic Style.”

 

6 p.m. Social hour and tasting hosted by Slow Food Denver (included in price)

6:30 p.m. Program and lecture

8:00 p.m. Book signing by author

All lecture programs: $15 member, $20 non-member. Space is limited so register early!

Slow Food Members are welcome to register for the discounted member price of $15, please click on reciprocal member price, no identification required.

 

“Water, water, water...There is no shortage of water in the desert but exactly the right amount, a perfect ratio of water to rock, water to sand, insuring that wide free open, generous spacing among plants and animals, homes and towns and cities, which makes the arid West so different from any other part of the nation. There is no lack of water here unless you try to establish a city where no city should be.” ? Edward Abbey, Desert Solitaire: A Season in the Wilderness

With the support of the Bonfils-Stanton Foundation and in line with the Gardens’ mission of connecting people with plants, we are excited to bring you a series designed to explore water as it relates to our ability to thrive in Colorado’s dry environment.

Throughout the 2017 series, we explore the importance of water through the lens of art, home gardening, conservation and home ownership. The lecture series includes topics such as enhancing the abundance of water throughout the world, rock gardening and water quality of the Colorado River through underwater photography.

A parallel series of intimate workshops, tours and trips further the exploration. Workshops include water-harvesting, aquaponics, photogram water camera-less photography, insect home building and many other hands-on opportunities. The Gardens offers day-long tours of Habitat Hero Gardens, gardens that provides resources and habitat for insects. A self-guided water wise home garden tour allows participants to explore ways in which their fellow Denverites use low water plants and water conservation techniques. Further your water experience by joining the Gardens on multi-day trips, including a canoe trip down the Gunnison River alongside a wetland ecologist and a photography trip to view the stunning water features around Vail.

 

 

Lecture - The Summer-Dry Garden

Successful and sustainable gardens must conform to natural precipitation cycles and the plants we use should not be drought tolerant, but climate tolerant. In a summer-dry climate, long summers with no rain is not drought, it is normal. This photo-driven lecture illustrates gardens in dry climate can be beautiful when good plant choices are combined with simple design techniques.

 

Saxon Holt

Saxon Holt is a professional garden photographer and has photographed for 25 books including “Hardy Succulents” by Gwen Kelaidis and “The American Meadow Garden” by John Greenlee. His website, PhotoBotanic.com, is dedicated to his garden photography and self-publishing projects. He is a Fellow of the Garden Writers Association who awarded his e-book, “Good Garden Photography” the best overall garden book of the year in 2015.

 

6 p.m. Social hour and tasting hosted by Slow Food Denver (included in price)

6:30 p.m. Program and lecture

8:00 p.m. Book signing by author

All lecture programs: $15 member, $20 non-member. Space is limited so register early!

Slow Food Members are welcome to register for the discounted member price of $15, please click on reciprocal member price, no identification required.

 

“Water, water, water...There is no shortage of water in the desert but exactly the right amount, a perfect ratio of water to rock, water to sand, insuring that wide free open, generous spacing among plants and animals, homes and towns and cities, which makes the arid West so different from any other part of the nation. There is no lack of water here unless you try to establish a city where no city should be.” ? Edward Abbey, Desert Solitaire: A Season in the Wilderness

With the support of the Bonfils-Stanton Foundation and in line with the Gardens’ mission of connecting people with plants, we are excited to bring you a series designed to explore water as it relates to our ability to thrive in Colorado’s dry environment.

Throughout the 2017 series, we explore the importance of water through the lens of art, home gardening, conservation and home ownership. The lecture series includes topics such as enhancing the abundance of water throughout the world, rock gardening and water quality of the Colorado River through underwater photography.

A parallel series of intimate workshops, tours and trips further the exploration. Workshops include water-harvesting, aquaponics, photogram water camera-less photography, insect home building and many other hands-on opportunities. The Gardens offers day-long tours of Habitat Hero Gardens, gardens that provides resources and habitat for insects. A self-guided water wise home garden tour allows participants to explore ways in which their fellow Denverites use low water plants and water conservation techniques. Further your water experience by joining the Gardens on multi-day trips, including a canoe trip down the Gunnison River alongside a wetland ecologist and a photography trip to view the stunning water features around Vail.

 

 

Lecture - Under the Colorado River

Learn about the Colorado River in a way you’ve never imagined! Kathleen Velo discusses her project “Water Flow: Under the Colorado River,” a series of color photograms created under the surface of the water in the Colorado river. This photographic project spans the entire river, from the headwaters in northern Colorado through five states into Mexico, where the river ends short of the Sea of Cortez. Hear about the adventures and challenges of creating these beautiful photograms, which explore water quality concerns and the transience of one of the most important rivers in the United States.

 

Kathleen Velo

Kathleen Velo is a photographic artist who uses non-traditional media and cameraless processes to explore water quality and environmental issues. Her work has been exhibited nationally and internationally and is in numerous public and private collections. She is the recipient of various grants and awards including artist project grants from the Fulbright commission, the United States Department of State and the Arizona Commission on the Arts. Velo holds an MFA in photography from Vermont College as well as an MA in Arts Education from the University of Arizona, and is a Fulbright alumna.

 

6 p.m. Social hour and tasting hosted by Slow Food Denver (included in price)

6:30 p.m. Program and lecture

All lecture programs: $15 member, $20 non-member. Space is limited so register early!

Slow Food Members are welcome to register for the discounted member price of $15, please click on reciprocal member price, no identification required.

 

“Water, water, water...There is no shortage of water in the desert but exactly the right amount, a perfect ratio of water to rock, water to sand, insuring that wide free open, generous spacing among plants and animals, homes and towns and cities, which makes the arid West so different from any other part of the nation. There is no lack of water here unless you try to establish a city where no city should be.” ? Edward Abbey, Desert Solitaire: A Season in the Wilderness

 

With the support of the Bonfils-Stanton Foundation and in line with the Gardens’ mission of connecting people with plants, we are excited to bring you a series designed to explore water as it relates to our ability to thrive in Colorado’s dry environment.

Throughout the 2017 series, we explore the importance of water through the lens of art, home gardening, conservation and home ownership. The lecture series includes topics such as enhancing the abundance of water throughout the world, rock gardening and water quality of the Colorado River through underwater photography.

A parallel series of intimate workshops, tours and trips further the exploration. Workshops include water-harvesting, aquaponics, photogram water camera-less photography, insect home building and many other hands-on opportunities. The Gardens offers day-long tours of Habitat Hero Gardens, gardens that provides resources and habitat for insects. A self-guided water wise home garden tour allows participants to explore ways in which their fellow Denverites use low water plants and water conservation techniques. Further your water experience by joining the Gardens on multi-day trips, including a canoe trip down the Gunnison River alongside a wetland ecologist and a photography trip to view the stunning water features around Vail.

 

 

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