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Lecture - Nothing is Impossible - The Winter Harvest Handbook

Eliot Coleman

 

Celebrated farming expert, Eliot Coleman, helped start the organic food movement with “The New Organic Grower” published 20 years ago. He continues to lead the way, pushing the limits of the harvest season. Coleman will share his innovative and highly successfully methods to raise crops throughout the coldest of winters. Discover how to grow produce of unparalleled freshness and quality in customized unheated or, in some cases, minimally heated, movable plastic greenhouses.

 

Coleman offers clear, concise details on greenhouse construction and maintenance, planting schedules, crop management, harvesting practices and even marketing methods. A passionate advocate for the revival of small-scale sustainable farming, Coleman provides a practical model for supplying fresh, locally grown produce during the winter season, even in climates where conventional wisdom says it can't be done.

 

Eliot Coleman has been involved in organic farming since 1966. He has experience in field vegetables, greenhouse vegetables, rotational grazing of livestock and range poultry. He is the author of “The New Organic Grower” (Chelsea Green, rev. 1995), “Four Season Harvest” (Chelsea Green, rev. 1999), and “The Winter Harvest Handbook” (Chelsea Green, 2009). As a commercial market gardener, director of agricultural research projects and teacher and lecturer on organic farming, he has studied and practiced all aspects of the craft. Coleman presently owns and operates Four Season Farm, a year-round market garden in Harborside, Maine.

 

6 p.m. Social hour and tasting hosted by Slow Food Denver (included in price)

Menu - Potatoes, yams, root vegetables, beans, hearty greens, honey, hearty herbs all will come together to show the bounty that is still available to us to share the glorious tastes that is Colorado in the winter.

7 p.m. Program and lecture

8:30 p.m. Book signing by author

 

All lecture programs: $20 member, $25 non-member. Space is limited so register early!

* ticket price includes entry into the outdoor exhibition.

 

Slow Food Members are welcome to register for the discounted member price of $15, please click on reciprocal member price, no idenification required.

 

“Nature gives to every time and season some beauties of its own.”

— Charles Dickens

 

With the support of the Bonfils-Stanton Foundation and in line with the Gardens' mission of connecting people with plants, this year's series is designed to take you along with us through nature’s seasons as we observe and appreciate the aesthetic and edible bounties that nature is able to provide for us within a year’s time.

 

 

 

Lecture - Succulently Yours: Going Lawn-less in the Intermountain West

Scott Calhoun

 

Succulent plants, with their striking forms and unrivaled drought tolerance, are integral to Western gardens. Considering the rich selections—Agave, Cactus, Dasylirion, Hesperaloe, Nolina and Yucca—no Intermountain garden should be without them. In fact, one could argue that with the exception of trees, no other plant type is as important as these “living sculptures.” Contrary to popular belief, you don’t have to have a rock garden to incorporate succulent plants—there is room for them in nearly any garden style, from formal to cottage. In this talk, Calhoun will begin with a brief history of succulent horticulture and then show the best techniques for creatively using these plants in Intermountain gardens.

 

 

Scott Calhoun explores back roads and backcountry in search of plants, gardens, architecture and food. He is the author of six gardening books. His first book, “Yard Full of Sun,” was awarded the 2006 American Horticultural Society Book Award; his second title, “Chasing Wildflowers,” won the Garden Writers Association 2008 Silver Book Award. Calhoun’s sixth book, “The Gardener’s Guide to Cactus,” was published in 2012. Scott writes a monthly garden column for Sunset Magazine and freelances for numerous print publications including American Gardener, Fine Gardening and Wildflower. Calhoun runs Zona Gardens, a design studio based in Tucson, Arizona. He gardens, writes and lectures across the United States. Catch up with Calhoun at ZonaGardens.com.

 

6 p.m. Social hour and tasting hosted by Slow Food Denver (included in price)

Menu - Prickly Pear is just the beginning of what we’ll explore using all sorts of succulents to make “succulent” bit and bites.

7 p.m. Program and lecture

8:30 p.m. Book signing by author

 

All lecture programs: $15 member, $20 non-member. Space is limited so register early!

 

Slow Food Members are welcome to register for the discounted member price of $15, please click on reciprocal member price, no idenification required.

 

“Nature gives to every time and season some beauties of its own.”

— Charles Dickens

 

With the support of the Bonfils-Stanton Foundation and in line with the Gardens' mission of connecting people with plants, this year's series is designed to take you along with us through nature’s seasons as we observe and appreciate the aesthetic and edible bounties that nature is able to provide for us within a year’s time.

 

 

 

Lecture - The Perpetual Pantry: Bridging the Gap from Ranch to City Cooking

Eugenia Bone

 

The bounty of fruits and vegetables grown in Colorado’s North Fork Valley where Bone summers inspired her to become a master canner, a gardener and author of the memoir/cookbook, “At Mesa's Edge.” But nine months out of the year she lives in New York City. Adapting the culinary opportunities of country living to the realities of city life was a challenge but the process led to a new way of cooking that merges the thrifty traditions of the past with the time constraints of the urban lifestyle. Two more books have come out of this study: “Well-Preserved,” a small-batch canning book that explores ways to use home-canned foods, and “The Kitchen Ecosystem,” Bone's newest book (set to be released in September 2014), which investigates the integration of recipes to create the healthiest and tastiest foods. This talk will change the way you look at the food you buy, prepare and discard, and will help you understand why the food you make tastes the way it does.

 

Eugenia Bone, a veteran food writer who has published in many national magazines and newspapers, is also a cookbook author. In addition to being a well loved author of the above mentioned books, as well as, “Mycophilia: Revelations From the Weird World of Mushrooms,” a popular science book about fungi (Rodale 2011), Bone has contributed to many cookbooks and literary journals, been nominated for a variety of food writing awards and participated in radio, interactive and online interviews, in addition to appearing multiple times on television. Bone teaches and lectures about food preservation. She lives in New York City and Crawford, Colorado.

 

6 p.m. Social hour and tasting hosted by Slow Food Denver (included in price)

Menu - Using Eugenia’s creative recipes and delightful sense of place as a guide, we’ll take the best of what we can get our hands on, and use her recipes to taste the best of what is available.

7 p.m. Program and lecture

8:30 p.m. Book signing by author

 

All lecture programs: $15 member, $20 non-member. Space is limited so register early!

 

Slow Food Members are welcome to register for the discounted member price of $15, please click on reciprocal member price, no idenification required.

 

“Nature gives to every time and season some beauties of its own.”

— Charles Dickens

 

With the support of the Bonfils-Stanton Foundation and in line with the Gardens' mission of connecting people with plants, this year's series is designed to take you along with us through nature’s seasons as we observe and appreciate the aesthetic and edible bounties that nature is able to provide for us within a year’s time.

 

 

 

Light on Form

Take your drawings from flat to fabulous. The secret to portraying light and shadow on your subjects lies in understanding the scientific method of lighting as it applies to different forms. Beginning with basic geometric shapes, refine your skills in showing light and volume on any subject. The class will work entirely in graphite pencil, but the principles apply to all other media. As you progress to fruits and vegetables, to leaves and flowers, and to entire plants with complex shapes, you will overcome the obstacles in creating three-dimensional drawings.

Prerequisite: Pencil I.

$225 member, $280 non-member.

• Mon., Jan. 6, 13, 20, 27, Feb. 3, 9 a.m. – Noon

Instructor: Constance Sayas

 

$225 member, $280 non-member.

WEEKEND WORKSHOP

• Fri. - Sun., Feb. 28 – March 2, 9 a.m. - 2:30 p.m.

Instructor: Marjorie Leggitt

 

$225 member, $280 non-member.

• Wed., Mar. 19, 26, April 2, 9, 23 1 - 4 p.m.

Instructor: Susan Rubin

 

$225 member, $280 non-member.

• Tue., Apr. 29, May 6, 13, 20, 27, 6 - 9 p.m.

Instructor: Marjorie Leggitt

 

Fee: $230 member, $285 non-member

• Fri. -Sun., June 27 - 29, 9 a.m. - 2:30 p.m.

Instructor: Susan Rubin

 

Literature of the Land: Spring 2014 Book Club

 

Join us for the spring 2014 session of Literature of the Land, a book club series hosted by the Helen Fowler Library. We'll read 3 books over 3 months, focusing on a specific topic of interest.

 

We delve into literature related to the land and to nature, discussing topics that may range from environmental issues to the culture of food and drink, from the American dust bowl to the cinnamon trees of Southeast Asia. This spring we'll examine plant exploration - in history, fiction, and the modern era – and how it relates to topics ranging from botanical illustration to current gastronomic trends.

 

In March, we’ll start with Marianne North’s Abundant Beauty: The Adventurous Travels of Marianne North – Botanical Artist, an engaging collection of journal excerpts from North’s travels. Her travels, which circled the globe twice, produced a valuable collection of more than 800 paintings and rich descriptions of botanical treasures.

 

In April, we’ll change gears and read Elizabeth Gilbert’s The Signature of All Things. From London to Peru to Tahiti to Amsterdam, the novel explores a female botanist’s research during the Age of Enlightenment and the Industrial Revolution.

 

In May, we’ll move on to The Mushroom Hunters: On the Trail of an Underground America by Langdon Cook, which follows a renowned culinary adventurer as he seeks one of nature’s last truly wild foods – the uncultivated mushroom.

 

Registration is mandatory as attendance will be limited in number to allow for interactive discussion in a friendly group setting. The cost is $5 per session, $15 for all three sessions.

 

Making and Using Flower Essences

Flower essences are a form of vibrational healing similar to homeopathy and acupuncture.

 

They are incredibly simple to make and wondrously effective for emotional, psychological, behavioral problems or traits such as procrastination, hyperactivity, jealousy, fear, lack of focused creativity, depression etc. They are practical and effective for our pets and children as well.There are no contraindications for flower essences; they can be used with any other form of treatment.

 

Everyone takes home an extensive handout and an all purpose Trauma Remedy and the very popular Fear Remedy.

 

Please bring to class:

A pair of small scissors, a bottle of spring water and a clear glass bowl or ramekin capacity 3-8 ounce. Instructor will provide all other materials.

 

$53 member, $58 non-member, includes $26 for materials.

 

Instructor: Christina Blume

 

Photo: Courtesy of Dan Zen (Flickr)

Making Goat's Milk Soap

Nothing is more luxurious than hand-crafted goat's milk soap, and it's even better when you can make it yourself for your home and for gift-giving! The class will include:

- Step-by-step instruction/demonstration in the cold-process technique for goat's milk soap

- Overview of the oils that can be used in soapmaking

- The properties of essential oils and creating fragrance combinations

- How to use additives, including herbs, flowers, oats, and honey

- Molds and cutting

- Lye safety

Participants will receive a bar of goat's milk soap, plus a basic soap recipe with suggested variations.

 

Instructor:

Sundari Kraft. Sundari is the author of "The Complete Idiot's Guide to Urban Homesteading" and the proud owner of two backyard dwarf dairy goats. She has written about goat's milk soapmaking for MaryJanesFarm magazine, and happily makes all of the soap used by her family.

 

$40 member and non-member, includes $5 for materials

 

Image: Courtesy of Gurney5 (Flickr)

Meet Rhubarb: sweet and savory

 

Curious about rhubarb? This perennial plant emerges in spring, growing long stocks of tart delight. Come meet rhubard and learn how to transform these stalks into dishes both sweet and savory.

 

Join Chef DeJa Walker in exploring rhubarb's qualities, complimentary flavors, history, nutritional attributes, and taste all of the sweet and savory treats you will create.

 

$36 members, $39 non members, includes $15 for all materials.

Instructor: Chef DeJa Walker

 

Minding your Vegetable Garden

 

You’ve come this far, your tomatoes, peppers and pumpkins are planted and growing. Now what? Proper care and maintenance of your vegetables through the summer months are key to a healthy harvest. Betty will take you through the steps of cultural care of your vegetables including watering, fertilizing and trouble shooting. She’ll cover knowing when and how to harvest and what to do with your bounty of home grown vegetables. Take home tips will include easy and delicious homegrown vegetable recipes and a list of cool season vegetables that can be planted in late summer for a fall harvest.

 

Instructor: Betty Cahill

 

$26 members, $31 non-members

 

Image: Courtesy of Randy Larson (Flickr)

Morning Photography

 

This is self-guided, no instructor event allows participants to photograph the sculptures in beautiful morning light, before the Gardens opens.

This self-guided, no instructor event allows participants to photograph the sculptures in beautiful morning light, before the Gardens opens.

 

To be held once a month.

 

$26 members, $28 non members.

 

Image Credit: Dale Chihuly, Blue Fiddleheads (detail), 2012. Dallas Arboretum, Dallas.

 

 

Mount Goliath Tour

 

Discover the life cycles and lore of the alpine tundra and the intense beauty of a natural garden that lasts only 40 frost-free days.

This is a trail of contrasts--awesome Rocky Mountain vistas of the Divide peaks; delicate floral treasures; wind-sculpted, ancient bristlecone pines; cold summit winds; and gentle summer breezes. The path winds through the exquisite blooms of the alpine tundra, talus slopes and subalpine meadows providing a delightful and educational tour in one of Colorado's most beautiful natural areas.

 

Mount Goliath docents lead the tour down the stunning M. Walter Pesman Trail – -a moderately difficult, 1.5 mile downhill trek from 12,153 ft. to 11,540 ft.

 

Important Remarks:

- Limited to 24 participants

- Tours are free of charge. However, YOU MUST PAY the amenity fee to the U.S. Forest Services at the Mount Evans Fee Station

- Be aware: this is a downhill trek on a moderately difficult trail that starts at 12,100 ft. Before registering, please ensure that you are physically fit and medically able to participate in vigorous physical activity at high altitude conditions.

- Donations to the Gardens for Mount Goliath tours are accepted and you can do so by choosing to register with the $10 option below.

- Tours are open to adults and children 10 years old and up.

- A Denver Botanic Gardens membership does not allow free access to the Mount Evans Recreation Area. Visitors to Mount Goliath and Mount Evans need to pay the amenity fee.

- Tours with less than 10 participants are subject to cancellation.

- Mount Goliath tours are not available as private tours

- For more information contact us at tours@botanicgardens.org

 

Please note - the Gardens does not manage the Mount Goliath recreational area, and questions not directly related to tours should be directed to the Clear Creek Ranger District in Idaho Springs.

 

Mount Zirkel Backpacking and Wildflower Viewing

 

Join members of the Horticulture staff to spend two nights and three days hiking, camping, and viewing wildflowers in the Mount Zirkel Wilderness area outside of Steamboat Springs. Enjoy this picturesque area during prime wildflower time while learning about the native flora from our horticulture experts.

 

Hiking distances and terrain will be moderate to difficult and this trip is not recommended for beginning hikers and backpackers.

 

Transportation will be provided. The group will leave from the Denver Botanic Gardens the morning of Friday, July 18 and return early evening on Sunday, July 20.

 

Meals will be provided but participants must have their own personal gear. Planning and logistical details will be gone over in a pre-trip group meeting in June.

 

$218 members, $228 nonmembers

Instructors: Brien Darby

 

 

Nature Play and Exploration for Early Childhood Classrooms with Project Learning Tree

Learn how to integrate environmental education into your early childhood classroom on a daily basis using Project Learning Tree’s early childhood curriculum; Environmental Experiences for Early Childhood Education. Take an in-depth, hands-on look at the Project Learning Tree curriculum and discover how to provide environmental experiences for young children through literature, music, art, and movement. Take a tour of the Mordecai Children’s Garden at Denver Botanic Gardens and learn how to create natural play and exploration spaces in your schoolyard and classroom.

 

The activities covered in this class are appropriate for PreK-K teachers

 

A 30 minute lunch break will be provided. You may either bring your own lunch or purchase a lunch from Offshoots Cafe. Participants should be prepared to spend time outdoors.

 

One-half semester hour of graduate level relicensure credit from the Colorado School of Mines is available on the day of the class for an additional $35.

 

Non-Native Noxious Beauties

• Mon., June 2, 9, 16, 23, 30, 1 -4 p.m.

Instructor: Constance Sayas

Through watercolor painting and practice in a variety of watercolor skills, this class will explore ways to present wildflower subjects, specifically noxious weeds. Students will be challenged by overlapping leaves, flowers and stems and will learn to portray a variety of textures and plant details. Individual guidance will help students select the appropriate techniques for washes, softening edges and painting details while producing a final plate for possible publication. This class might involve research in the library and in the herbarium. Fee: $230 member, $285 non-member. Prerequisites: Pencil I, Watercolor II or Certificate in Botanical Illustration.

 

 

One Man Bonsai Show - Artist Talk

 

 

The Denver Botanic gardens is pleased to feature Allan Hills presenting his work in the second, spring one man bonsai show to be held in the Bill Hosokawa Bonsai Pavilion.

 

Please join us for an artist talk and tour where Mr. Hills will present his ideas about his bonsai including how bonsai, as an art form, is evolving in North America and specific information about each bonsai on display.

Members $15, Non-members $20

Allen Hills:

Allan Hills was born and raised in Charleston, South Carolina and did his undergraduate work at the University of North Carolina. He completed his PhD in Geology at Yale University.

While living in Buffalo, New York, Allan came across bonsai books published by the Brooklyn Botanic Gardens and began experimenting by making bonsai from plants he found in local greenhouses. Allan admits to killing many plants as he learned about root pruning and the wiring of bonsai to style.

A move to Denver in 1975 brought Allan in contact with the Rocky Mountain Bonsai Society (RMBS.) Since this introduction, Allan has given many programs and demonstrations at the local level and at national conventions held in Denver. Additionally, Allan has twice served as president of RMBS.

Allan is much respected for his artistic talent, finding and discussing the best attributes of trees being designed as bonsai. This artistic talent extends into oil painting and the creation of viewing stones (suiseki) which he displays in his home and at the RMBS Annual Show.

 

One Square Foot of Colorado

• Wed., June 4, 11, 18, 25, July 2, 1 - 4 p.m.

Instructor: Susan Rubin

The Rock Alpine Garden is brimming with blooms and students will be able to select a square foot of ground and explore the diversity of plant life. Working outdoors and also in the classroom, the class will capture a moment in the life of a garden. Students will learn how to fill a square foot, edge-to-edge, and depict everything from plants in all stages to insects, stones and earth. Working in colored pencil and mixed media, the focus will be on composition, accuracy, lighting and textures with plenty of guidance and support to complete a finished plate. Fee: $230 member, $285 non-member. Prerequisites: Pencil I, Colored pencil I or Certificate in Botanical Illustration.

 

Outlawed in Colorado

• Thur., Apr. 24, May 1, 15, 22, 29, 9 a.m. – Noon

Instructor: Susan Dimarchi

Students will select a spring flowering invasive species from a provided list for careful study. Skills will be acquired specific to designing a finished botanical plate for reproduction. Learn to address scale, style, composition and color. With instructor guidance, class critiques and individual assistance, students will work in colored pencil to complete the finished product for possible inclusion in the upcoming educational outreach material. This class might involve research in the library and the herbarium. Fee: $225 member, $280 non-member. Prerequisites: Pencil I, Colored pencil II or Certificate in Botanical Illustration.

 

 

Perfect Picnics

 

 

 

 

Perfecting Perspective

Registration begins December 10, 2013 at 9am. Class will appear sold out until then.

Even experienced illustrators sometimes struggle with foreshortening and simplify their subjects to eliminate difficult elements. Students will work with botanical subjects that demonstrate each aspect of perspective and learn techniques for seeing and depicting it accurately. The class will work entirely in graphite pencil, but the principles apply to all art media. Gain confidence in drafting skills and improve all drawings from this class, forward. Fee: $225 member, $280 non-member. Prerequisite: Pencil I.

 

WEEKEND WORKSHOP

• Fri.- Sun., Jan. 17 - 19, 9 a.m. - 2:30 p.m. (classroom B)

Instructor: Marjorie Leggitt

 

• Wed., Mar. 19, 26, April 2, 9, 23, 9 a.m. - Noon

Instructor: Marjorie Leggitt

 

WEEKEND WORKSHOP

• Fri. -Sun., May 9 - 11, 9 a.m. - 2:30 p.m.

Instructor: Marjorie Leggitt

 

Permaculture Design Introduction

 

When people, plants, animals, water, air, buildings, energy, communications, etc., interact beneficially with each other through good design and placement, the area becomes more resilient, more of a Permanent Agriculture.

 

Permaculture is a Design system based on the joining of indigenous wisdom practices with current ecological activism, guided by Ethics and Principles. Permaculture reminds us that "everything gardens" and teaches a sustainable worldview that brings together many disciplines into a systematic approach for gardening, lifestyle and being. Based on deep Observation, Pattern Recognition and Working with Energetic flows (wind, water, people, sound, animals, community, etc.) we engage in the organization of our endeavors to eliminate waste and support natural processes for enhancing our gardening. Permaculture is actively taught and practiced by thousands of people all over the planet we call home. There are many classic Permaculture techniques that have been developed and we will explore some of them in this class, including sheetmulching, herb spirals, guild planting, alternative economics, stacking functions. season extension and natural building.

 

Participants in this class will gain a basic understanding of the Ethics and Principles of Permaculture, along with having a specific set of practical gardening and lifestyle ideas that they can put into action immediately. We will have 'hands on' time during the morning class to practice Observation, a foundational Permaculture skill. We will examine some examples of Permaculture style gardening at Denver Botanic Gardens Chatfield. The class will also include an additional "hands on" exercise in the afternoon to enhance the lecture information. The participants will have practical information and experience to use for their personal situation at home, work or both.

 

Instructor: Jim Gibson and Mary O'Brien

 

$52 member, $55 non-member, $47 CSA shareholders (reciprocal member).

 

 

 

 

 

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