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Lectures

 

Cancellation Policy: Cancellations more than one week prior to a class are subject to a 15% cancellation fee. Cancellations with less than one weeks notice are non-refundable; please consider your payment a donation to the Gardens.

 

2017 Pollinator Summit – Every Flower Counts

Every Flower Counts: Cultivating Minds and Landscapes for Pollinators

The second annual Pollinator Summit convened by the Colorado Pollinator Network brings together nationally and regionally recognized pollinator experts to present and discuss strategies for protecting and managing land to support pollinators in Colorado. This Summit is designed for organizations, agencies, businesses, professionals, educators, growers, land managers, researchers and volunteers actively working to conserve and protect pollinators and their habitats.

 

Morning Keynote Speaker

Scott Hoffman Black

Bringing Back the Pollinators: An Integrated Landscape Approach to Pollinator Conservation

 

Life on Earth as we know it depends upon pollinators. An estimated 85% of the world’s flowering plants depend on animals—mostly insects—for pollination. Pollinators sustain wild plant communities that feed and shelter myriad other wildlife. Pollinators are also crucial to agriculture and to our diet: more than two-thirds of crop species—including fruit, vegetable, spice, nut, and oilseed crops for people and forage for livestock—are dependent upon pollinators.

Unfortunately, pollinator declines put all of this at risk. Beekeepers are losing 30% to 40% of their hives each year and numerous wild, unmanaged pollinator species native to North America are also experiencing declines. Over a quarter of North America’s bumble bees have are at risk of extinction and monarch butterfly populations have declined by more than 80%.

Scott will discuss the latest science on pollinators, their importance and decline, and how all people can take action to help.

 

Scott Hoffman Black is an internationally renowned conservationist who has been at the forefront of the pollinator conservation movement for two decades. He is executive director of the Xerces Society, which under his leadership has become the premier invertebrate conservation organization in North America.

 

Scott’s work has led to protection and restoration of habitat on hundreds of thousands of acres of rangelands, forests, and farmland as well as protection for many endangered species. He is an author of the best-selling Attracting Native Pollinators and Gardening for Butterflies and has written more than two hundred other publications. His work has been honored with several awards, including the 2011 Colorado State University College of Agricultural Sciences Honor Alumnus Award and the U.S. Forest Service Wings Across the Americas 2012 Butterfly Conservation Award.

 

 

Afternoon Keynote Speaker

Mervi Hjelmroos-Koski

World travelers without the passport: review of plants fingerprints

 

Pollen grains are not only essential in plant reproduction, they are also valuable tools in countless other applications. A pollen grain’s uniquely ornamented outer wall, called the exine, consists of sporopollenin, which is the most resistant material known in the organic world. It is chemically stable and remains unchanged in pollen grains that are 500 million years old. It is resistant to non-oxidative chemicals, enzymes and strong chemical reagents, concentrated acids and bases and remains unchanged when pollen grains are heated to 300°C (572°F). With these unique qualities, pollen grains can provide insight into climate change and plant-climate interactions, landscape development and human impact in vegetation throughout the history of mankind. Pollen grains can even help solve murders.

 

Mervi Hjelmroos-Koski of Denver Botanic Gardens is a Finnish-born scientist with a Ph.D. in quaternary biology from the University of Lund, Sweden and D.Sc. in aeropalynology from the University of Stockholm. She has worked with pollen grains since her first year in college and has been involved in all aspects of them from marine archaeology to asthma and from lake sediments in the arctic tundra to the snowfields in South Georgia, Antarctic. She is the author and co-author of many scholarly publications and has taught at universities worldwide. Since 2007, she has coordinated and managed Denver Botanic Gardens’ School of Botanical Art and Illustration.

 

Breakout sessions will include:

Education, Land Management, Policy/Advocacy, Research and Science.

 

$35, includes all programming and lunch

 

Lecture - The Summer-Dry Garden

Successful and sustainable gardens must conform to natural precipitation cycles and the plants we use should not be drought tolerant, but climate tolerant. In a summer-dry climate, long summers with no rain is not drought, it is normal. This photo-driven lecture illustrates gardens in dry climate can be beautiful when good plant choices are combined with simple design techniques.

 

Saxon Holt

Saxon Holt is a professional garden photographer and has photographed for 25 books including “Hardy Succulents” by Gwen Kelaidis and “The American Meadow Garden” by John Greenlee. His website, PhotoBotanic.com, is dedicated to his garden photography and self-publishing projects. He is a Fellow of the Garden Writers Association who awarded his e-book, “Good Garden Photography” the best overall garden book of the year in 2015.

 

6 p.m. Social hour and tasting hosted by Slow Food Denver (included in price)

6:30 p.m. Program and lecture

8:00 p.m. Book signing by author

All lecture programs: $15 member, $20 non-member. Space is limited so register early!

Slow Food Members are welcome to register for the discounted member price of $15, please click on reciprocal member price, no identification required.

 

“Water, water, water...There is no shortage of water in the desert but exactly the right amount, a perfect ratio of water to rock, water to sand, insuring that wide free open, generous spacing among plants and animals, homes and towns and cities, which makes the arid West so different from any other part of the nation. There is no lack of water here unless you try to establish a city where no city should be.” ? Edward Abbey, Desert Solitaire: A Season in the Wilderness

With the support of the Bonfils-Stanton Foundation and in line with the Gardens’ mission of connecting people with plants, we are excited to bring you a series designed to explore water as it relates to our ability to thrive in Colorado’s dry environment.

Throughout the 2017 series, we explore the importance of water through the lens of art, home gardening, conservation and home ownership. The lecture series includes topics such as enhancing the abundance of water throughout the world, rock gardening and water quality of the Colorado River through underwater photography.

A parallel series of intimate workshops, tours and trips further the exploration. Workshops include water-harvesting, aquaponics, photogram water camera-less photography, insect home building and many other hands-on opportunities. The Gardens offers day-long tours of Habitat Hero Gardens, gardens that provides resources and habitat for insects. A self-guided water wise home garden tour allows participants to explore ways in which their fellow Denverites use low water plants and water conservation techniques. Further your water experience by joining the Gardens on multi-day trips, including a canoe trip down the Gunnison River alongside a wetland ecologist and a photography trip to view the stunning water features around Vail.

 

 

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